Heibel-March building at 900-902 Range Line faces demolition

Once again, the Heibel-March building at 900-902 Range Line is facing demolition. And once again, this proves the axiom that the way to save a historic building is to put it to work. Built in 1910, according to the a May 23, 2012 article in the Columbia Daily Tribune, the building faces an August 1, 2012 deadline…

Arch McCard cabin at 121 West Blvd.

Here’s a link to a Nov. 28, 2010 article in the Columbia Daily Tribune outlining the history of this house, which started as a two-room cabin. http://www.columbiatribune.com/news/2010/nov/28/west-boulevard-gingerbread-house-for-sale/ But if you’d like to see inside as well, you can go to this link on the House of Brokers site. http://www.houseofbrokers.com/listings/detail.php?lid=60280602&limit=0&offset=0&aid=006200047&oid=006200001&temp=1&aname=Betty+Tice&aimg=1&chome=1&agent_hasfeat=7&&posc=2&post=4&cfq=radarea%3D3%26startnewsearch%3D1%26aid%3D006200047%26oid%3D006200001%26temp%3D1%26aname%3DBetty%2BTice%26aimg%3D1%26chome%3D1%26agent_hasfeat%3D7%26searchtypesent%3D5%26radarea%3D3%26address%3Dwest%2Bblvd%26state%3D29%26b.x%3D48%26b.y%3D6%26SRSearchDate%3D1290972632%26SRRecordCount%3D4%26SRPage%3D1%26SRPageCount%3D1%26SRPageLinks%3D6

Is that history on your plate?

Tomorrow, I’ll get to learn a different kind of history — the history of food preparation in Missouri. This free event, “What’s for Dinner, Missouri?” will be held at 7 p.m., Nov. 16 in the Friends Room at the Columbia Public Library. William T. Stolz, assistant director of reference for the Western Historical Manuscript Collection-Columbia…

Money magazine’s Top 10

Do you ever wonder if those ratings, such as those in Money magazine, make any sense? I used to, but I’ve since decided the answer is, “Naw.” I could give you a lot of reasons for that, but here is one. This year’s Number 10 city, Rogers, Arkansas, gets kudos for 23 buildings on the…

Historic Walks and Government Documents

True confession: I love government documents, especially the National Register of Historic Places government documents. You can learn to love them too, because each National Register of Historic Places document contains a trove of information, including maps and photographs. The documents can even be used for fun — really! A while back a friend of…

Missouri Theatre – Tough Luck, Mary Todd Lincoln’s cousin

In 2008, the Missouri Theatre, now called the Missouri Theatre Center for the Arts, under went a $10 million renovation, again becoming the jewel of downtown Columbia. But with every gain, sometimes comes a loss — as in the case of the 1928 construction of the Missouri Theatre. Named in 1979 to the National Register of…

A hidden home at Stephens College

Senior Hall, home to thousands of students over the years, actually started out as just that — a home. Built in 1841, Senior Hall is actually built around an 1840s house, built for Oliver Parker, of New Hampshire. He moved to Columbia in 1821 and opened and operated a general merchandise store. He died the…

Black History – Annie Fisher, 2911 Old Highway 63 South

Nearly hidden between apartment buildings is a piece of Black history — the home of Annie Fisher, an early African-American entrepreneur. Located at 2911 Old Highway 63 South, this home is threatened with demolition, but that would erase a piece of history few know about. The house was named to the Columbia Notable Properties list in…

Greenwood Heights – built by slaves

Historic homes can be our touchstones to history, some of which we like to recall and some we’d like to forget. Greenwood Manor or Greenwood Heights at 3005 Mexico Gravel Road was built by slaves owned by Walter Raleigh Lenoir of Lenoir, North Carolina. That city was named for Lenoir’s father, who fought in the…